About Us

Friday, 9 June 2017

Treeson outside the Library

By Dr Rosemary Kuhn

How the mighty are falling…no not Pravin or Jonas, but the mighty jacarandas near the Pietermaritzburg main library – one by one, examples of ‘garden capture’ by forces of radical transformation who are doing things in the interests of efficiency and growth.
First it was the tree next to the stair case leading up to Chemistry which made way for economic development in the name of an addition to the Chemistry building; no others will be cut down, us anxious lot were told. Horrors. Another stab at radical transformation – the redesign of the adjacent building began, and down came the huge beautiful jacaranda. When I marched outside ready to tie myself to the trunk, a hard hat stopped me in my tracks, treeting me with great suspicion. Hard hat looked taken aback when I asked why the tree was being axed. “We were given orders to cut it down” – shriek! A yes person, no soul. “To make way for pipes.” Pipes? I squeaked in disbelief, pipes!  That massive beauty – for pipes! The new-look building will have a sun patio and yes there will be plenty of sun, not a leaf left for shade.
The last straw. One of two jacaranda giants at opposite ends of the lawn in front of the Clock Tower building, stalwarts of nature, nurture, our campus and library life, lost the battle to survive, such cruel treetment. I had been on leave, and the deed was already underway before I could organise a protest march or ‘#trees must tower’ campaign.  The whole ‘look’ of the main campus is now lopsided like the sliding rand. An equally outraged colleague devoted an entire morning to trying to get to the bottom of this act of treeson and after hours of being pushed from pillar to post, we are none the wiser about who signed the job card. The hard hat response was: ‘Following orders, dunno who sanctioned it, phone ….’. A little later: ‘Its rotten’. Later ‘It might fall on someone’. It might fall on someone?? Not sure if this is fake news or the truth, or an unsubstantiated intelligence report but upon inspection it looks to be one of the healthiest trees I have ever seen. Could this mean the unthinkable – that all trees on campus might be under threat because ‘one might fall on someone’? One thing is for sure, if this tree cutting continues, the physical campus is under threat of having its status downgraded to that of ‘garden refuse’. Oh woe, the tree, tis gone.

Picture from 1975 courtesy of the UKZN Pmb archives showing the jacaranda in the background


 The once magnificent jacaranda 2017







Wednesday, 31 May 2017

South African Library Week, 18-26 March 2017

by: Jillian Viljoen
The UKZN libraries commemorated South African Library week from 18-26 March 2017. The UKZN libraries used this opportunity to highlight the importance of libraries and the various services which they provide. The theme for Library Week was “My Library, Your Library”, and in this vein, various programs were held across the libraries of UKZN.


My colleague, Renee, and I co-ordinated and facilitated the events on the Pietermaritzburg (Pmb) campus. From 20-24 March, the Pmb campus library had various guest speakers, from different walks of life, who shared how the UKZN libraries have assisted them in their studies, research and academic growth and development. All the activities took place in the Main library foyer to encourage the university community to participate in a library setting. It also highlighted that libraries can be used to encourage freedom of expression and are not just places where books and computers are housed. Each speaker, all from UKZN, gave unique insights with personal experiences, anecdotes and motivational and inspirational words of encouragement which captured the audience’s attention. Guest speakers included Siyanda Kheswa, a former student and now a lecturer in the Information Studies Department; Stella Sabi, a team leader at the Writing Place in the College of Humanities; Nonhlanhla Ngcobo, the Manager of Library Information Services and LIASA KZN Chair; Melusi Mntungwa, a UKZN Media Masters student; Sizwe Madlala, a UKZN student with visual impairment who spoke about the challenges of using the university facilities as a blind student; Kyle Allan, a UKZN student and poet who facilitated a creative writing session after his presentation; Nazim Gani, the Head and Senior Librarian at the Alan Paton Centre and Centre for African Literary Studies; and Anthony Gathambiri, a UKZN PhD student and lecturer, and the author of the book “The President”. All these individuals graciously gave up their time to address the UKZN community and to encourage students, especially, to make use of the library facilities and services to the fullest.

Various training sessions were also held on using the library catalogue to find library materials housed in the libraries on the 5 UKZN campuses, databases to find articles, the importance of referencing and how to reference, and the use of a reference management package called Endnote. The off-campus access was also highlighted to demonstrate to the students that the resources of the library can be accessed anywhere and at any time. These training sessions provided skills to assist students in accessing information. Access to information is key to the growth and development of every human mind and the library has so much information; all you need is the skills to access it and you can navigate your way independently through the rich resources at your disposal.

Various competitions, lucky draws and fun prizes added to the festive event, intimating that libraries can co-ordinate fun activities while still being a place of learning and information. Thanks to Van Schaik Book Store in Pmb for the new books which they generously donated to the library as well as the postids and pens which were given to the audience at the talks. In an age where libraries are seen as buildings with walls, places to meet friends and, sadly, sometimes targets for vandalism, South African Library Week allowed the UKZN Pietermaritzburg library staff to showcase the true value of libraries in the digital age, encouraging people to see the theme “Your Library, My Library” practically.

There were various displays on Library Week, Amnesty Week, the UKZN Press, the Pmb library staff, the Mzala Nxumalo Centre which houses political studies resources, the Alan Paton Centre and CALS, and banners from the Disability Unit, the Alan Paton Centre and CALS. Students were also encouraged to write any comments on their thoughts on the library on cut-outs of hands in different colours. These comments were then added to the library week display. This encouraged students to constructively engage, anonymously, on their perceptions of the Pmb libraries.

18-26 March was also Amnesty Week at the UKZN libraries. This was a good opportunity to encourage all students to return the overdue books in their possession and their fines would be removed; no questions asked. This initiative was very successful.

An American novelist, Shelby Foote, once said “A university is just a group of buildings gathered around a library.” This implies that a library is the heart of a university. South African Library Week was used to promote this idea and to encourage the university community to acknowledge and respect the role that libraries play at any institution and in any community. The UKZN Pmb campus library had a fun-filled, eventful week, with motivational talks by “home-grown” UKZN personalities. Whoever said that libraries were just boring buildings with old dusty books probably missed out on our lively, entertaining South African Library Week celebrations.


Guest speakers 

 




Siyanda
Sizwe
Nonhlanhla
Melusi
 





 Kyle
 Stella
 Nazim
 Anthony
 

Some of the students who attended the talks.                             
Do you see yourself in the crowd?
Some of the students who won prizes.
Congratulations!


Thursday, 4 May 2017

“Pay Per View” (PPV) vs. Subscriptions – The Challenge facing Academic Libraries

Omesh Jagarnath
The value of the library to the university’s mission and vision as well as its priority in the university’s allocation of funds can no longer be assumed. Libraries are constantly facing challenges, one of the more serious being the budget constraints which in turn may impact negatively on service delivery to the users. The rising costs of resources, especially the electronic formats including e-journals and databases are taking a huge slice of the library budget. This places a heavy strain on libraries and its resources, especially the librarians who have to ensure that the same levels of services are maintained. Time and again, libraries have to continually defend their worth and importance to academics or campus administrators (Spalding & Wang 2006, p. 495). Libraries have to submit convincing proposals or arguments as to why funds requested from the parent body are needed to subscribe to some of the much needed databases. Yet, it is these very academics, and some of the administrators who may require these resources for their own teaching, learning and research needs. There is a common belief that the World Wide Web provides access to all of the world’s accumulated knowledge and that a simple Google search will provide all the relevant information a person may need on a topic (Cheng 2016). What many people don’t know is that valuable peer reviewed information is never freely available and that much of the information they access is in fact paid for by the library. The academic community do not know that it takes a sizeable budget to maintain library facilities; purchase license agreements to collections and to hire staff with specialized skills and expertise to make this content available. Therefore, the question that arises is: How do libraries continue to provide the same level of quality service to patrons despite dwindling budgetary constraints? How can libraries maintain their worth and importance by ensuring users are satisfied? If universities pride themselves on their research and quality teaching and learning, how can libraries ensure that students continue to receive quality research material to pursue their studies? These and many more questions of this nature, poses serious challenges to librarians across the globe. Hence, for these reasons, librarians need to be equipped with various skills in sourcing alternative methods of meeting the growing need for information amongst researchers. In addition, understanding research trends and their role in the research cycle is crucial in connecting users to information (Cheng 2016).
 
(Source: https://www.google.co.za/search?q=payfor+view+journal+articles&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjEl__8go3TAhVGLMAKHVIfBWEQ_AUIBygC&biw=1093&bih=474#imgrc=p5U9wb3YSu5sYM:&spf=227)

The University of Kwa-Zulu Natal library has been very proactive in meeting these challenges and seeking alternative ways of serving its patrons. The University for instance had been a loyal subscriber to Science Direct, one of the world’s leading sources for scientific, technical and medical research. However, with the rising yearly cost of the Science Direct database, the library had no option but to terminate its subscription for 2017 which would have cost the institution R15m in subscription for 2017. As much as this was not expected, and amidst an outcry from some academics, perhaps this was a turning point amongst academics in realizing the importance of libraries and the cost of subscription material needed for teaching and research. However, the library did not cancel its subscription to Science Direct without embarking on internal research and viewing user statistics and URLs. As a result it was discovered that there was large overlap with a few of the other key databases that the library subscribed to. The library also assured its patrons (especially Academics) that it will meet their demands by adopting a “Pay Per View” (PPV) service, with a turnaround time of 24 hours. However, with the increased volume of article requests, this turnaround time may exceed 24 hours due to several challenges one may face, especially when incorrect information is provided or lacking in some instances. Hence, this means that the library will purchase the article on behalf of the patron and bear the cost. In addition, there are plans to archive the purchased article within the library’s intranet and make them available as read only to students and staff of UKZN. At the present moment, the Pay Per View service is only open to registered Masters, PHD students and academics of UKZN. Since its inception in February 2016, the PPV service has been well received by academics and masters students. The trend of Pay Per View (PPV) is not a new one. As far back as the 1990s libraries were experimenting with an alternative to traditional forms of inter-library loan. This was in part a response to the rising costs of serial prices and the need to continue with the provision of a quality service to users (Chamberlain & MacAlpine, 2008: 30). In view of the current budget deficits affecting libraries, several issues come to mind. Publishers will either have to rethink their subscription policies and lower their tariffs, or risk losing their customers. Libraries may have to continue monitoring usage statistics of databases and adjust their subscriptions needs accordingly (Troknya 2015). At the same time libraries will continue to seek innovative ways to survive without compromising on service delivery. Hence the questions that arises - How should libraries respond to these challenges? Is it really feasible for libraries to subscribe to a database costing millions just because that was the trend in the past when only a small percentage of the articles are accessed? A review of the Pay Per View option for the past year has cost UKZN libraries well below a million rands. Is this the way forward? What are your thoughts on this?
 Bibliography
1. Cheng, J. 2016, “The top 10 challenges Academic Librarians face in 2016”, web log, viewed 30 March 2017, https://hub.wiley.com/community/exchanges/discover/blog/2016/09/13/the-top-10-challenges-academic-librarians-face-in-2016
2. Troknya, M. 2015, Budget cuts require tough choices, viewed 31 March 2017, http://publiclibrariesonline.org/2015/12/sophies-choice-with-library-budgets/
3. Hiller, S 2001, Assessing user needs, satisfaction, and library performance at the University of Washington Libraries, Library Trends, vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 605-625.
4. Spalding, H. H & Wang, J 2006, The challenges and opportunities of marketing academic libraries in the USA: Experiences of US academic libraries with global application, Library Management, vol. 27, issue 6/7, pp. 494-504. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/01435120610702477

Tuesday, 21 February 2017

The academic role of Librarians in the University environment

Simon Shezi
Academic librarians play vital and varied roles in the life of the university, guiding students and faculty at the reference desk, instructing library research sessions, and developing library collections.  It is a truism to say that librarians in all sectors of an academic library wear many different hats and provide numerous services to patrons (Alsop & Bordonaro, 2007).
Some reasons why an academic librarian with disciplinary expertise could be of help, be it physically or virtually include:
  • Search for full text of an article about a particular subject
  • Find new coverage of an event from historic times  to today
  • Help locate content that is subscribed to by the libraries
  • Undertake general searches about information and other items
  • Look at  historical manuscripts, maps, writings, and images or film footage
  • Identify legislation, hearing, or other government publications about a subject
  • Help with research writing, referencing, resources gathering, publication, and post publication matters
  • Train in the use of information resources
  • Locate background information about an institution, produce well researched        papers and identify useful market research resources, etc., these are some of the    roles that academic librarians can play within the institution.

    However, from observation and informal social interactions among students and faculty members in any country it has become obvious that many members of the university environment do not appreciate the roles that librarians play in the system. They retain a stereotype notion of librarians and books within the walls of a library and the "HUSH" sign they have become accustomed to. As librarians, it is important we rebrand ourselves; get ourselves etched into the consciousness of these patrons we are meant to serve.
    It is important for librarians to learn to use technology, become more proactive by anticipating user needs, attend events within the university, and relate more with faculty members, other staff, and students.

    Reference
    Alsop, J and Bordonaro, K. 2007. Multiple roles of academic librarians. Electronic Journal of Academic and Special Librarianship.
    Http://Southenlibrarianship.icaap.org